A.P. Karpinsky Russian Geological Research Institute (VSEGEI).

Acad. F.N. Chernyshev Central Scientific Geological and Prospecting Museum. Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 199106, VO, Аverage prospect 74, phone/fax  +7 (812) 3215399

St. Petersburg State Mining Institute, St. Petersburg, Vasilevsky Island 21 Line, 2.

Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (Russian Academy of Scinces). Moscow, Russia, ul.Kosygina, 19, phone: +7 (499) 137 14 84

Museum at the Baikonur Cosmodrome.

Pulkovo Observatory.

 

Visitors to Namibia's capital city Windhoek can see one of the country's most visited national monument without too much trouble or extra expense. The Gibeon Meteorites are situated in Post Street Mall, a popular tourist attraction to for Namibian arts and crafts. They are permanently fixed at the Meteorite Fountain, not far from the Independence Avenue entrance.
Namibia is renowned for its meteorites with the most extensive, The Gibeon Meteorite Shower, landing in southern Namibia. Estimates are that it occurred over an initial area of some 20,000km², with the more concentrated centre covering 2,500km² in the surrounding region of the village of Gibeon, (approximately 60km south of Mariental. The distribution of meteorites was uneven with the farms south-east of Gibeon baring the brunt of the deluge.
Between 100 and 150 specimens have been recovered since they were first reported in 1838 by the then Captain (later General) Sir JE Alexander, on his travels on the east side of the Great Fish River. He took a few fragments back to London and they were analysed by the famous astronomer Sir John Herschel, and identified as of meteor origin from the amount of nickel present. Due to the amount and traces of materials found in The Gibeon Meteorites, they are classed as iron meteorites.
The contents of these meteorites were to be of a distinct advantage to the local Nama population, who used to belt out the fragments and hammer them into assegais and other weapons such as rifle bullets. 
Before the advent of WW1, the export of meteorites was prohibited and from 1911 to 1913, 37 specimens of the Gibeon Meteorites were brought to Windhoek by German SWA's State Geologist, Dr P Range for safekeeping. Despite the restrictions and the threat of a maximum fine of 600 German Marks, several specimens were donated worldwide to research institutions. The original 33 found near Gibeon were kept in Windhoek. After WW1, the meteorites were displayed in Zoo Park in the city centre. They ranged from 195-506kg in weight.

The Gibeon Meteorites, Post Street Mall, Windhoek, were proclaimed a national monument on 15th February 1950.

Visitors to Namibia's capital city Windhoek can see one of the country's most visited national monument without too much trouble or extra expense. The Gibeon Meteorites are situated in Post Street Mall, a popular tourist attraction to for Namibian arts and crafts. They are permanently fixed at the Meteorite Fountain, not far from the Independence Avenue entrance.

Namibia is renowned for its meteorites with the most extensive, The Gibeon Meteorite Shower, landing in southern Namibia. Estimates are that it occurred over an initial area of some 20,000km², with the more concentrated centre covering 2,500km² in the surrounding region of the village of Gibeon, (approximately 60km south of Mariental. The distribution of meteorites was uneven with the farms south-east of Gibeon baring the brunt of the deluge.

The Gibeon Meteorites, Post Street Mall, Windhoek, were proclaimed a national monument.

Between 100 and 150 specimens have been recovered since they were first reported in 1838 by the then Captain (later General) Sir JE Alexander, on his travels on the east side of the Great Fish River. He took a few fragments back to London and they were analysed by the famous astronomer Sir John Herschel, and identified as of meteor origin from the amount of nickel present. Due to the amount and traces of materials found in The Gibeon Meteorites, they are classed as iron meteorites.

The contents of these meteorites were to be of a distinct advantage to the local Nama population, who used to belt out the fragments and hammer them into assegais and other weapons such as rifle bullets. 

The Gibeon Meteorites, Post Street Mall, Windhoek, were proclaimed a national monument.

Before the advent of WW1, the export of meteorites was prohibited and from 1911 to 1913, 37 specimens of the Gibeon Meteorites were brought to Windhoek by German SWA's State Geologist, Dr P Range for safekeeping. Despite the restrictions and the threat of a maximum fine of 600 German Marks, several specimens were donated worldwide to research institutions. The original 33 found near Gibeon were kept in Windhoek. After WW1, the meteorites were displayed in Zoo Park in the city centre. They ranged from 195-506kg in weight.

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